Keep Your Bad Little Girls Away From My Son

How come little girls are so much meaner than little boys?

First, let me clearly state, I am the father of 2 sons: Andrew at 3 years old and Matthew almost 1.  I haven’t had experience with little girls.  Maybe I have a different perspective.  But, little girls seem to be so much meaner than little boys.  I noticed this on several occasions over the last few months. Here are just 2 memorable times.

Andrew is good at playing with other boys.  He is easy going, full of energy and makes friends easily.  He calls every other little kid his friend. He has a lot of experience playing with other kids. But, all his troubles have been with little girls.

A few days ago, my wife, Heidi,  took the boys to the local park to play.  This is a park he goes regularly and always find a few little boys to play with. On this day, there were no little boys around and only a few girls playing together.   When he went over to play with the girls, they yelled at him to get away and not play with them.

Andrew was crushed.  He never heard this before from any other kid.  As you can imagine, Heidi was very, very sad.  Later, we talked and I used this as an opportunity for a life lesson.

Additionally, he had 2 run-ins in the play area at our local Chick-Fil-A.  Both times little girls made him cry.  For the other 10 or so visits to Chick-Fil-A, he played with little boys and is totally happy.

Just this weekend, we went to the same park and Andrew found other little boys to play with.  Although the boys were a few years older, they were happy to run around and play together.   Then, recently at mass, he was happily playing with a group of boys whose families recently emigrated to Dallas from Africa.   So, its not realted to age, race or income, but rather if the child is a girl.

Actually, the only little girl who played well with Andrew was a girl at park with downs syndrome. Andrew and her played together for about an hour.   When she left to go home, Andrew asked where his friend was going.

Maybe I will encourage my son to only play with boys for the forseeable future.

So, keep your mean little girls away from my son.

An Older Fathers Guide to Potty Training Your Son in 7 Days

Recently, I undertook one of the first major challenges of fatherhood.  It was time to potty train our oldest son Andrew. Just the mere thought of potty training filled me with dread.  Although this is a required skill every child must master, I was extremely anxious about helping him accomplish it smoothly.  But, after Andrew learned to use the potty in 7 days, I realized my feelings were totally were unfounded.

Dads about to potty train a child don’t have to fret over potty training.  Here is some of my experience and a few easy steps to make it a stress-free experience for both of you.  Hopefully, the experience of one father and son can help in your efforts to potty train your child.

Two main reasons caused me to dread potty training. First, I have almost no interaction, personally or professionally, with kids other than my own. So, I do not have enough experience to potty train effectively.  Then, as an older dad, in my mid-40s and Andrew is our oldest on, I do not have the right temperment for the job.

However, exactly because of my trepidation, I decided to be responsible for potty training.  Plus, as the father of a son, I felt it was my duty to take the lead.

Just like most modern dads, I wanted to hear from experts before undertaking potty training.  To start, I talked to a few parents with good judgment.   Also, I read some articles in magazines and online.  I even watched some YouTube videos from trustworthy sources, such as Childrens Medical Center of Dallas, where we live.  But I soon become overwhelmed with advice.  So, make sure to limit your research and advice seeking.

Probably the most important element of potty training is understanding your child’s personality.  Our son Andrew, almost 3 when we started potty training, is a really good and well-behaved boy.  He is sensitive and anxious to please others.  These kids often are easier to potty train than other personality types.  Understanding your child’s personality will help make the process easier.

For a few months before we started, I acted as a role model.  He watched me use the toilet and I told him soon he would use the potty like daddy. This helped him begin to understand.

Timing was a big worry. When to start potty training?  Eventually, I realized he was not going to wake up one day and tell me he was ready to begin potty training.   So, we started it when we could focus on it for a full week.

During the week of potty training, we stayed home. We didn’t eat in restaurants or go out anywhere. Andrew had to learn how to use the potty at home before doing it in public.

Before starting, Andrew got to pick it out his own potty at the store.   Then, during potty training, we also decided to use real underwear. We had to do more laundry than normal this week, but it proved to be one of main reasons he was able to be potty trained in 7 days.  We did not want to use pull-ups.  With pull ups, he had a hard time feeling if he was wet.  Plus, my sister in law took 3 months to potty train her son using pull-ups.

We had a few pair of underwear a family member had given us.  We used these for the first 2 days.  Then, when he made some progress, after the first 2 days,  we took him to the store to pick out some underwear. Getting to pick out a few pair of Thomas the Tank Engine underwear made him very proud.  Once he picked these out himself, potty training went smoothly the rest of the week.

Andrew was completely potty trained in 7 days. We started on a Satuday and by the following Friday, he was able to use the potty by himself.

The most important part of the whole potty training experience is to be supportive of your child. This is a new experience for him. Make sure he knows you are proud of him for trying. When he does use the potty, make it a celebration. Even weeks after he is potty trained, Andrew and I do the potty dance after he goes.

Support extends after he is potty trained. Several weeks after Andrew was potty trained, he had an accident and was very upset this happened. I reassured him this happens to every person.

Later, your child may use the potty to test the rules. Andrew also has to use the potty just after he is sent to bed for the night. He also does this during nap time.  We will have to work on this with Andrew.

Finally, get support from your spouse.

But most importantly, trust yourself. You and your spouse know your child better than anyone.

Taking Andrew to the Pub to Celebrate Potty Training
Taking Andrew to the Pub to Celebrate Potty Training